Kirby Records Family

This blog is for the Kirby Records family and friends to keep up with whats gong on back at the cabin. I will try to keep it going with interesting stories of our life as they occur and any new information on the Records/Isaac geneaology. Please feel free to contribute your own stories.

Thursday, December 16, 2004

The " Patu"

As I indicated in my first post, I want to try to do some Geneology information sharing .
Following is a picture that has been in my family since the late 1800's I recently figured out what it is all about. The items shown were in my great great grandmothers collection of indian artifacts she gathered around her land at Umatilla Landing in the mid 1800's. In the 1890's she sold a lot of the collection off in pieces to support herself. I believe the picture matches fairly closely the items she listed in a letter to the smithsonian. They had requested a photograph and maybe this is one she had taken to show what she had for sale. In the Picture on the top shelf to the right is a club (to the left of the "birdman" figure") This club and one other piece were purchased from Mrs. Helen Kunzie in the 1890's .


Kunzie Collection
Originally uploaded by krecords.

The club is called a "Patu", it is solid brass modled after a weapon of New Zealand natives. This particular "Patu" turns out to be made in England in the 1700's and sailed with captain cook as a trade item. It was traded on Cook's third voyage to natives in Nanook Bay in Alaska. Over the next 100 years it made its way to north eastern Oregon and into Mrs. Kunzies' collection via the Umatilla natives. It was then sold and shipped by train to the Smithsonian Institution and has been recently recommended for repatriation to the federated tribes of the Umatilla. Hopefully it will be displayed at their museum in Pendleton and I can go see it in person!
Another interesting note: Helen Kunzie's daughter married Charles Bodle Isaac. who was the son of a Mary Thorne. Mary had a cousin named Captain Johnathan Thorn who sailed a ship for John Jacob Astor. That ship and captain Thorns demise came in the early 1800's in nanook bay where he was clubbed to death by the local natives. Hmmmmm makes you wonder....


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